BET 1: Prednisolone for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

A short cut review was carried out to establish whether corticosteroids are safe and effective in managing the symptoms of acute gouty arthritis. Five studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that corticosteroids are an effective and safe alternative to non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients presenting with acute gouty arthritis.

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2yaL1wQ

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Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

Best Evidence Topic reports (BETs) summarise the evidence pertaining to particular clinical questions. They are not systematic reviews, but rather contain the best (highest level) evidence that can be practically obtained by busy practicing clinicians. The search strategies used to find the best evidence are reported in detail in order to allow clinicians to update searches whenever necessary. Each BET is based on a clinical scenario and ends with a clinical bottom line which indicates, in the light of the evidence found, what the reporting clinician would do if faced with the same scenario again.

The BETs published below were first reported at the Critical Appraisal Journal Club at the Manchester Royal Infirmary1 or placed on the BestBETs website. Each BET has been constructed in the four stages that have been described elsewhere.2 The BETs shown here together with those published previously and those currently…

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2wYRHZE

BET 2: Treatment of frostbite with iloprost

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

A short cut review was carried out to establish whether an infusion of iloprost can be used to treat frostbite to reduce the risk of needing an amputation. Three studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that iloprost may reduce the risk of amputation after frostbite.

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2yaKJGg

BET 1: SIRS criteria as a way of predicting mortality in acute pancreatitis

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether the presence of systemic inflammatory response criteria in emergency department patients with pancreatitis is predictive of the risk of death. Eight papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The review concludes that the presence of SIRS in emergency department patients with pancreatitis is associated with a higher risk of mortality.

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2wgwKgR

Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

Best Evidence Topic reports (BETs) summarise the evidence pertaining to particular clinical questions. They are not systematic reviews, but rather contain the best (highest level) evidence that can be practically obtained by busy practising clinicians. The search strategies used to find the best evidence are reported in detail in order to allow clinicians to update searches whenever necessary. Each BET is based on a clinical scenario and ends with a clinical bottom line that indicates, in the light of the evidence found, what the reporting clinician would do if faced with the same scenario again.

The BETs published below were first reported at the Critical Appraisal Journal Club at the Manchester Royal Infirmary1 or placed on the BestBETs website. Each BET has been constructed in the four stages that have been described elsewhere.2 The BETs shown here, together with those published previously and those currently…

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2vWNlne

Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

Best Evidence Topic reports (BETs) summarise the evidence pertaining to particular clinical questions. They are not systematic reviews, but rather contain the best (highest level) evidence that can be practically obtained by busy practising clinicians. The search strategies used to find the best evidence are reported in detail in order to allow clinicians to update searches whenever necessary. Each BET is based on a clinical scenario and ends with a clinical bottom line that indicates, in the light of the evidence found, what the reporting clinician would do if faced with the same scenario again.

The BETs published below were first reported at the Critical Appraisal Journal Club at the Manchester Royal Infirmary1 or placed on the BestBETs website. Each BET has been constructed in the four stages that have been described elsewhere.2 The BETs shown here, together with those published previously and those currently…

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2vWNlne

Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary

Jean-Francois Hibbert recommends

Best Evidence Topic reports (BETs) summarise the evidence pertaining to particular clinical questions. They are not systematic reviews, but rather contain the best (highest level) evidence that can be practically obtained by busy practising clinicians. The search strategies used to find the best evidence are reported in detail in order to allow clinicians to update searches whenever necessary. Each BET is based on a clinical scenario and ends with a clinical bottom line that indicates, in the light of the evidence found, what the reporting clinician would do if faced with the same scenario again.

The BETs published below were first reported at the Critical Appraisal Journal Club at the Manchester Royal Infirmary1 or placed on the BestBETs website. Each BET has been constructed in the four stages that have been described elsewhere.2 The BETs shown here, together with those published previously and those currently…

from Emergency Medicine Journal Best evidence topic reports http://ift.tt/2vWNlne